Author Topic: How To Compare Frame Sizes Using More than Just TT Length  (Read 3195 times)

Offline MAYTRICKS

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How To Compare Frame Sizes Using More than Just TT Length
« on: January 11, 2012, 01:43:09 AM »

So after various flatland frames decided to take a closer look at frame geometry. I tried researching this on the board but, didn't find anything solid enough to use as a guideline to choose a frame without the option of trying it beforehand. I then decided to research elsewhere then remembered George French(the man behind GSport)had a tech section I've used several times as a guideline for wheel-building. And so here you have it, a fairly simple guideline to follow when in the market for a new frame. Simply compare your current frame to others using the guideline to get a better idea of what a frame will feel like in size using more than top-tube and chain-stay length. There are undoubtedly more variables that effect the overall feel of a bike like say everything but, I think most of you would agreethe effective size of a frame is a good place to start.

"So remember a degree steeper on the seat tube will mean a frame is effectively 0.15" longer and a half degree steeper head angle will make a frame's front end effectively 0.15" shorter"

Click below to read more. For those of you who are skeptical or merely trusting the above is the guideline summed up. I had fun comparing frames I've had and finding out why some frames felt so different from one another despite HT, TT, and CS. For example one of my favorite frames has been the Sick Child Metropolitan which I've come to find is the largest frame I've ridden according to this guideline.


http://www.gsportbmx.com/2005/03/isnt-that-bike-a-bit-small-for-you-mate/
« Last Edit: January 11, 2012, 02:41:10 AM by MATRICKS »

Offline MAYTRICKS

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Re: How To Compare Frame Sizes Using More than Just TT Length
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2012, 02:41:46 AM »

Corrected, thanks.